Student’s thoughts on ASVAB

Doe Mai Na, Staff Reporter

In order to test the aptitude of students for their future career paths and military enlistment, the school gave the ASVAB testing for the junior class on Oct. 22 and Oct. 23  respectfully. 

Juniors with last name A-L tested on Tuesday while those with last names M-Z tested on Wednesday. The testing took place in the auditorium at 8:15 a.m. for both days. 

The testing for ASVAB was mandatory for the class of 2021 as it was made clear in an email sent by Vanessa Bednorz to all the juniors, but it made many students unhappy as they felt “a bit negative” about having to participate in the testing junior Jesus Navarez said. 

It gives hope to those students who thinks it’s hopeless for them to attend college because they are lacking in academics. It gives them other options such as vocational school or military.”

— 11, Eh Bway Paw

“When I found out it was mandatory, I thought it was kinda unfair,” junior Eh Bway Paw said. 

However, Eh Bway Paw said she also understood why it was necessary for all the juniors to take part in the test. 

 

I think it was necessary for the military staff and our administrators and counselors to see what we specialize in to sort of guide us students in the right directions.”

— 11, Jesus Navarez

“ I understand why they made it mandatory because it benefits students in many ways,” Eh Bway Paw said. “It also made me realize that there are other options besides college.” 

 

 

Participating in the testing made students realize that they don’t possess the knowledge for  certain categories. 

“Taking the test made me realize I lack knowledge in many areas such as in the electricity or welding field,” Eh Bway Paw said. “There was a total of 9 parts of the test, but we only took 8 of them. Many parts were about general knowledge in different areas, which I found out I lack heavily.”

Junior Valaria Loya said that there was no point in making all the juniors participate in the testing. 

“It took up class time and most juniors have no idea what they want to do with their lives,” Loya said. 

Even though not many students agree with the test, Navarez said it was necessary for administrators to see what students specialize in. 

“I think it was necessary for the military staff and our administrators and counselors to see what we specialize in to sort of guide us students in the right directions,” Navarez said. “[However,] the score may not be accurate because it only covered 2 sections of specialized material and may lead the administrators to believe something else.”

By taking the ASVAB test, it allows students to explore the different options presented to them aside from college and give a sense of hope for the path they want to take. 

“ I like the idea that they inform students of other options the students can take if they didn’t want to or can’t attend college after graduation,” Eh Bway Paw said. “It gives hope to those students who thinks it’s hopeless for them to attend college because they are lacking in academics. It gives them other options such as vocational school or military.”